Stephen’s Gap Cave – What You Need to Know

So last week I said that we took a quick weekend trip up to Huntsville, Alabama to check out this cave I found on the internet.

We’ve never been caving before — we haven’t even done much hiking as a couple — so I was a little nervous and didn’t know what to expect. Imagining a cave, I tend to think of mazes of dark, narrow, claustrophobic tunnels — headlamps, ropes, getting lost, dying. You know, that kind of thing.

Stephen’s Gap smashes all those ideas to pieces. It is like an underground cathedral.

What’s encouraging about Stephen’s Gap is that you don’t need any special knowledge or gear. An experienced spelunker can rappel into the cave through one entrance where a waterfall plummets straight down. . .

But for the rest of us, there’s a second entrance that you can just walk right down into.

Now, here is the most important thing you need to know about Stephen’s Gap if you visit:

 

Request a Permit

Stephen’s Gap is owned by the Southeastern Cave Conservancy (SCCi) which strives to maintain and preserve caves all over the southeastern United States. The permit is actually free, and it’s really easy to apply and be approved. You just need to fill out a form on the internet and then electronically sign a waiver. — In return, they’ll give you a wealth of information about what to expect at the cave itself, where to park and find the trail leading to it, and “clean caving” procedures to protect the bat population.

What to Bring

All you really need is water, shoes with really good traction, and clothes you’re willing to get muddy.

We brought headlamps but didn’t end up using them. The two entrances to the cave are large and let in plenty of light.

It’s less than a mile to get from the road to the cave, but it’s a fairly strenuous hike and

took us longer than we expected. We went after a week of heavy rains, so the trail was pretty muddy, rugged, slippery, and narrow in parts.  I was expecting slippery conditions at the cave, but the trail was probably the bigger challenge! The descent into the cave is a little steep, but not to the degree where you actually have to “climb,” and once you’re down into it, the surfaces are fairly large and flat.

Pro Tip: Use the address provided in the permit when you’re trying to find the parking area. I just searched “Stephen’s Gap” in Google Maps and it led us astray.

 

 

 

A Note on Safety

The SCCi keeps caves in an “untouched” state — you won’t find guard rails, stairs, pavement, railings, or any of that kind of thing. So yes, there is very real danger in visiting a cave like this. It is wet, slippery, and there are very long drops. More than one person has died there over the years. So if you visit, be smart, and be safe!

 

A Weekend in Huntsville, Alabama

Huntsville, Alabama is a hidden treasure.

I found out about it kind of by accident — The Hubs and I had two days

off in a row on the horizon, so I was planning a short get-away for us and researching Mississippi day trips. All these really cool places in Alabama started showing up in my search results, though, and there were two attractions I really wanted to see.

Huntsville just happened to be smack-dab in between them, and so it was a logical place to spend the night!

And now I can’t wait to go back. We barely scratched the surface of what there is to see there. Hopefully next time, we’ll be able to check out some of the more mainstream attractions like the Rocket Center and Monte Sano State Park.

As it is, we explored secret caves and canyons, visited a fun little brewery, and had a really great dinner all in under 24 hours!

From Southern Mississippi, it was a 4-5 hour drive which is probably about the farthest we would attempt for a weekend getaway. Starting from anywhere in Tennessee, Georgia, or the Florida panhandle would also probably be do-able on a 3-day weekend.

 

Our first stop was Dismals Canyon located 1.5 hours west of Huntsville.

 

Dismals Canyon, Phil Campbell, AL

It’s privately owned and the admission was a little steep at $12 per adult, but it is so well maintained, family friendly, and truly epic that we found it worthwhile.

After paying admission in their large gift shop/eatery and receiving your trail map, you descend stairs upon stairs down into the canyon. The stairs are actually pretty strenuous and may be unsuitable for those with certain health conditions, but aside from that it was a really low-key trail and many people had their kids and puppies in tow.

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The trail brings you past waterfalls and between looming mossy boulders that line a small stream and loops back, about 1.5 miles round trip. A map is provided that makes the trail seem kind of like a scavenger hunt for all their creative place markers and pieces of local trivia.

👌

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The canyon is otherworldly and a little eerie even in the daytime. They also do guided tours at night featuring a local glow-worm population!

 

Where to Eat, Where to Stay

From there, we ran up the road to Huntsville and found our motel for the evening. Knights Inn Huntsville was a great deal for us; I think only about $60 for the night, and it was clean and comfortable.

Dinner at Connors Steak and Seafood where the lights were low, the staff were awesome, and everything was delicious. I had grilled salmon and the hubs endorses their steak which was perfect with the Cigar Box Malbec.

We found breakfast the next morning at the Blue Plate Cafe, which had a fun, retro ambiance. I have never really understood the southern country fried steak thing, but I had a bite of Hubs’ here and it finally made sense — that crispy batter and perfectly seasoned gravy….Try the cheesy hash-browns, too.

 

Stephen’s Gap Cave

Our primary objective on this trip was to visit Stephen’s Gap.

It. Was. Amazing.

It also happens to be very accessible, even to the novice cave explorer with no gear. I’m going to write a separate post with all the details, but will leave you with this taste. (Update: here’s that post!)

#stephensgap #cave

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Brew Scene

Huntsville is a bit of a brewery hub, so we had to check it out. Our final stop before heading out of town was Below the Radar. Their website doesn’t seem to be working right now, but we were lured in by descriptions of some of their dark beers.

We tried a flight of six that piqued our interest. I don’t think we discovered any new favorites, but some of them were pretty unusual! The Gravel Road Saison tasted like candy. I had high hopes for the 300 Blackout Smoked Porter, but it didn’t knock my socks off.

Huntsville! Recommended for the:

  • Outdoorsy
  • Craft Beer Enthusiasts
  • Budget Travelers